MyMDHA

Senior Living at MDHA Communities

More than 960 senior residents call MDHA properties home, including 26 people over age 90 and two over age 100. Three properties, Edgefield Manor, Carleen Batson Waller Manner, and Gernert Studio Apartments are designated as seniors-only and are home to vibrant communities of active resident associations who plan weekly gatherings and monthly outings like fashion shows, bingo and movie night. All high-rise facilities also offer monthly activities such as exercise classes, special education seminars, movies, birthday and holiday celebrations.

All utilities are included with the price of rent, which is based on income. That can be a major convenience for seniors living on a limited income. Most buildings feature fitness rooms and all have laundry facilities and modern appliances.

In recent years, MDHA has strengthened its focus on its senior and disabled residents. Major renovations at Gernert Studio Apartments, Edgefield Manor and Parthenon Towers are complete with upgrades underway at Hadley Park Towers and Vine Hill Towers. Improvements to the high-rise facilities include the addition of energy-efficient central heating and cooling systems; improved floor-space utilization; new kitchen appliances; and major energy upgrades.

MDHA provides Social Service Coordinators at all high-rise apartments which help link residents to community service providers that assist with aging in place. Social Service Coordinators also help residents acquire needed benefits, complete forms or paper work as needed, look for risk factors to determine living independently, establish a referral process, monitor on-going services and serve as an advocate for the resident.

In addition, security personnel are in place at all high-rise properties and most are equipped with state-of-the-art security camera systems.

Each year MDHA honors a very distinct group of seniors – The 90+ Club. The 90+ Club is an exclusive group consisting of 26 public housing residents who are ages 90 and above, including two people over age 100.

Seniors are an important part of the MDHA community and the agency is pleased to be home to such a great group of valued residents.

MDHA Responds to NewsChannel 5 Allegations
During the past year, MDHA has defended against allegations it paid property owners too little. Now the agency finds itself facing allegations it paid a land owner too much. The confusion underscores the fact that real estate acquisition can be complicated and emotional.

In the case of the recent story about Rocketown and the Music City Center, NewsChannel5 gets it wrong. NewsChannel5’s story pits the claims of a former employee against the agency without ever offering an outside, independent, third party review. The responsible thing would have been to seek a third opinion on the validity of the allegations, as MDHA did in determining the property’s value.

MDHA followed the same process with Rocketown as it followed with other real estate purchases by the agency. The process goes like this: MDHA researches the value of a property, makes an offer and then works to find a mutually acceptable purchase price. Following this process, MDHA has reached a mutually acceptable purchase price with 14 of 17 property owners in the footprint of the Music City Center.

Let’s look at the specifics of the Rocketown purchase.

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NashMDHA’s photostream on Flickr.MDHA and Nashville Mayor Dean join the Bordeaux Hills community to celebrate the completion of a neighborhood improvement project and to unveil a plaque commemorating the community’s flood recovery. 
http://www.nashville-mdha.org/view_news.php?id=152
Councilman Lonnell Matthews looks over the newly installed flood memorial markerMayor Dean and residents at the newly installed flood memorial markerBordeaux Hills neighbors Councilman Lonnell Matthews talks to neighbors about the improvements to the park and area sidewalks

NashMDHA’s photostream on Flickr.

MDHA and Nashville Mayor Dean join the Bordeaux Hills community to celebrate the completion of a neighborhood improvement project and to unveil a plaque commemorating the community’s flood recovery.

http://www.nashville-mdha.org/view_news.php?id=152
Fall Fest at Farm in the City Community Garden, a set on Flickr.We had a blast hosting a Fall Pumpkin Painting event for the kids at our Farm in the City Community Garden on Saturday, October 29, 2011. Kids of all ages from J. Henry Hale and Andrew Jackson Apartments came out to create artful gourds. From scary to sweet the pumpkin event was a real treat!
Our little pumpkin patch with J. Henry Hale and Farm in the City in the backgroundOur first resident to the pumpkin patchBoo!Hard at work...

Fall Fest at Farm in the City Community Garden, a set on Flickr.

We had a blast hosting a Fall Pumpkin Painting event for the kids at our Farm in the City Community Garden on Saturday, October 29, 2011. Kids of all ages from J. Henry Hale and Andrew Jackson Apartments came out to create artful gourds. From scary to sweet the pumpkin event was a real treat!
A sneak-peek at how the Historic Trolley Barns will look once renovations are complete. The buildings were built in the early 1940’s as part of the New Deal by the WPA. Now, they are being reborn to house a creative campus of non-profit and creative companies: Emma, Entrepreneur Center, Center for Nonprofit Management, Hands On Nashville, MDHA, Centric Architecture and others to be announced.

A sneak-peek at how the Historic Trolley Barns will look once renovations are complete. The buildings were built in the early 1940’s as part of the New Deal by the WPA. Now, they are being reborn to house a creative campus of non-profit and creative companies: Emma, Entrepreneur Center, Center for Nonprofit Management, Hands On Nashville, MDHA, Centric Architecture and others to be announced.

An artist rendering of the future Ryman Lofts. You will notice the spaces reserved on the exterior of the building for both sculptural and large-scale art installations.

An artist rendering of the future Ryman Lofts. You will notice the spaces reserved on the exterior of the building for both sculptural and large-scale art installations.

Rolling Mill Hill rolls along with Kick-Off of Two Major Projects - Artist Lofts & a Creative Campus

Nashville is known around the world for our creative community, so it was a great pleasure for us to join Mayor Karl Dean yesterday to kick-off two major projects that will support the arts and the innovators.

The Historic Trolley Barns are being reborn into a creative campus that will house Nashville’s premier non-profit and creative companies. Just up the hill along Hermitage Avenue, construction is beginning on Ryman Lofts, Nashville’s first affordable urban community designed specifically for artists.  

“Nashville is known around the world for the work of our creative community and each year more people move here to Music City to pursue careers in the arts,” Dean said. “The Ryman Lofts speak directly to the uniqueness of the Music City identity and will continue to help cultivate the city’s culturally rich and diverse community by creating affordable urban housing opportunities for artists.”

Ryman Lofts is scheduled to open in 2012, and the 60-unit apartment community will include one-bedroom and three-bedroom units featuring unconventional floor plans, large windows, hard surfaces and significant meeting spaces that are conducive to artistic endeavors. The entire community was designed with artists in mind and with the help of a focus group made up of Nashville artists from a variety of genres.

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Who better to kick-off an event for artist lofts than a collection of some of Nashville’s talented singer-songwriters? The Collective, currently competing on The Sing-Off, started off Wednesday’s event with a great performance!

Who better to kick-off an event for artist lofts than a collection of some of Nashville’s talented singer-songwriters? The Collective, currently competing on The Sing-Off, started off Wednesday’s event with a great performance!

Rolling Mill Hill rolls along with groundbreaking for Ryman Lofts, Nashville’s first affordable community specifically designed for artists, and the Historic Trolley Barns, Nashville’s new center for creativity and innovation!http://www.nashville-mdha.org/view_news.php?id=145

Rolling Mill Hill rolls along with groundbreaking for Ryman Lofts, Nashville’s first affordable community specifically designed for artists, and the Historic Trolley Barns, Nashville’s new center for creativity and innovation!
http://www.nashville-mdha.org/view_news.php?id=145

Residents Celebrate Completion of Renovations at Parthenon Towers

Residents at MDHA’s high-rise community in west Nashville, Parthenon Towers, joined Mayor Karl Dean on Thursday, September 15 to celebrate the completion of major renovations to the 41-year-old building.  They are the first major renovations since original construction in 1970 and mark the first time that residents will have individual heat and air units inside their apartments. Nearly 300 senior and disabled Nashvillians live at Parthenon Towers.

"The renovations here look great and are no doubt a source of pride for all of you," Mayor Dean told residents gathered in the new community room space at Parthenon. "In addition to making your apartments more comfortable, the energy saving upgrades here will pay dividends in cost savings for years to come and will help reduce the city’s carbon footprint."

Through a partnership with Siemens Industry, Inc. MDHA also included a number of energy-saving upgrades at Parthenon Towers. Each unit now includes a state of the art Variable Refrigerant Volume (VRV) heating and cooling system which is expected to reduce heating costs by up to 60 percent and cooling costs by 30 percent. When combined with other VRV systems in MDHA’s community housing, the agency expects to reduce carbon emissions by more than 603,000 pounds per year. MDHA also added energy-efficient appliances, low-flow water fixtures, energy efficient lighting and solar panels to the roof of Parthenon Towers. The solar installation, along with panels installed at Edgefield Manor and Madison Towers, made MDHA the largest solar power generator in Nashville-Davidson County and one of the largest in Tennessee.

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